Learn more"}},{"@type":"Question","name":"What's a good price for a used car?","acceptedAnswer":{"@type":"Answer","text":"

Used car prices vary greatly based on the year, make, model, body style, condition level, mileage, and the location or ZIP code where the vehicle is being sold. This is why it is important to use a trusted car price guide like the one at Edmunds.

\n\t\n\t

If you're buying directly from the owner, you'll want to look at the private-party value and make an offer based on that. If you're buying from a dealership, you'll want to focus on the retail value and make an offer that is between the trade-in value and the retail value.

Learn more"}},{"@type":"Question","name":"What brand of car has the highest resale value?","acceptedAnswer":{"@type":"Answer","text":"Lexus has the highest resale value among luxury brands, and Toyota has the highest resale value among non-luxury makes, according to Edmunds analysts. But these aren't the only two brands with strong resale value. Get your car appraised at Edmunds to see how much value it actually has. Learn more"}},{"@type":"Question","name":"What are some other price guides or payment calculators?","acceptedAnswer":{"@type":"Answer","text":"

\nWhile we believe that Edmunds has the best pricing information out there, thanks to over 50 years of experience, there are other sites out there you might encounter. Here's an overview:\n

\n

Kelley Blue Book (KBB)

\n

\nKelley Blue Book is an automotive pricing and sales guide. It is sometimes mistaken for the \"Black Book,\" which is an internal guide for dealerships to determine wholesale car prices.\n

\n

\nKelley Blue Book is one of many tools, along with the Black Book, used by car dealers to research and determine car values for their inventory.\n

\n

\nIn general, you'll find that the Kelley Blue Book values are similar to those provided by Edmunds. We don't have access to how Kelley Blue Book calculates its prices, but at a high level, Kelley also is paying attention to vehicle age, trim, market conditions, features and mileage.\n

\n
\n

Kelley Blue Book price vs. Edmunds

\n

\nThe Kelley Blue Book price is a trademarked car valuation from KBB. Many people use this term, along with \"Black Book\" or \"Edmunds TMV.\" They're all terms used to describe the estimated market value of the vehicle in question. This price is used to determine what to pay for a new or used car.\n

\n
\n

\nThe KBB price will vary based on the shape your automobile is in. There are four levels: fair, good, very good and excellent. KBB says that of the cars it values, 3% are excellent, 18% are fair, 23% are very good and 54% are in good condition.\n

\n

\nIf you want to compare those terms to Edmunds' terms, \"very good\" at Blue Book would be our \"outstanding,\" \"good\" would be our \"clean,\" and \"fair\" is our \"rough.\" KBB does not have an equivalent for the \"damaged\" description.\n

\n

NADA used car guide

\n

\n The NADA (National Automobile Dealers Association) Guide started in 1933. It\n provides used-vehicle valuation products and services to the auto, finance,\n fleet, government and insurance industries. \n

\n\n

\n The pricing guide is an industry tool used by many dealerships and is not generally available to the car-buying\n (or selling) public. Instead, the company created a consumer-facing website\n called NADA guides that provides pricing valuation to consumers for used and\n new vehicles, classic cars, motorcycles, boats, RVs and manufactured homes.\n

\n

NADA car values vs. Edmunds

\n

\n NADA uses J.D. Power data to assess the market and create its own price guide\n to new and used car sales. If the numbers don't match up with those from\n Edmunds, this is likely why. But essentially, both NADA and Edmunds are\n providing a guide to the market, to pinpoint a reasonable price range for a\n vehicle at a dealer's lot. NADA has three vehicle states — rough, average,\n clean — that generally mirror those on Edmunds.\n

Learn more"}},{"@type":"Question","name":"How much should I pay for a used car?","acceptedAnswer":{"@type":"Answer","text":"

To determine what a fair price would be for a used car for sale, either at a dealership or by a private seller, check our appraisal tool for its market value. This tool, found on this page, will show you the current trade-in, private party and dealer retail values. Keep in mind the following terms:

Trade-in: Estimated value if you trade the car in at a dealership
Private party: Estimated value if buying from a private seller
Dealer retail: Estimated value if buying from a dealership

Learn more"}},{"@type":"Question","name":"What is a fair price for a vehicle made before 1990?","acceptedAnswer":{"@type":"Answer","text":"

Edmunds does not provide pricing for model years prior to 1990. Due to\nthe wide variability in their value based on a number of factors, we are unable\nto derive fair and meaningful values for them. We apologize for any\ninconvenience this may cause.

We suggest looking at the prices\nset by owners on vehicles for sale on Autotrader or Classics on Autotrader.\nAlternatively, you can use the advanced search tool on eBay Motors and select\n\"completed listings\" to see what actual buyers have been paying.

Learn more"}},{"@type":"Question","name":"How do I select a specific engine when appraising a car on Edmunds?","acceptedAnswer":{"@type":"Answer","text":"

A vehicle's engine choices are typically presented at the step where you select the vehicle's style or trim. However, sometimes a certain engine choice is only available as an option or as part of an option package. In these cases, you will not see the engine displayed when selecting the style or trim. Instead, you will see it at the second step of the configuration process, when you are choosing options and option packages. Note: If you do not see the engine in the options list, try clicking the \"info\" link beside any of the available option packages to see if they include it.

Learn more"}},{"@type":"Question","name":"Why don't I see options listed on the appraisal tool for Honda and Acura models?","acceptedAnswer":{"@type":"Answer","text":"

Unlike most manufacturers, which offer individual options or option packages on their vehicles, Honda and Acura only offer different styles — i.e., differently equipped versions of the same model. In other words, product planners at Honda or Acura choose the various features to be included on each of their styles, and (with the exception of dealer-installed options) dealers or consumers cannot separately add new or different ones.

\n

For example, Honda offers these styles for the 2019 Honda CR-V:

\n
\n
  • LX
  • \n
  • LX AWD
  • \n
  • EX
  • \n
  • EX AWD
  • \n
  • EX-L
  • \n
  • EX-L AWD
  • \n
  • Touring
  • \n
  • Touring AWD
  • \n
    \n

    In this case, there are a few obvious features that differentiate the model's styles, specifically the transmission type and the availability of a navigation system. (To see everything that's included with each style, you will need to click the \"See all features & specs\" link associated with each style and then review the list provided.)

    \n

    Also, please note that dealer-installed options and accessories offered by Honda and Acura dealers, such as backup sensors or all-weather floor mats, vary from dealer to dealer and region to region. Accordingly, Edmunds is not able to provide information or pricing about them.

    Learn more"}},{"@type":"Question","name":"Why don't I see option packages listed on the appraisal tool?","acceptedAnswer":{"@type":"Answer","text":"

    Edmunds typically does not list specific option packages for used vehicles but instead lists the individual features that an option package originally contained. That's because used-car shoppers may not be aware that a “Sport package” (for example) was available on a particular car when it was new, but they can easily see whether the car has a sunroof and spoiler.

    \n

    Also, please note that we do not always list every option for used cars. If a specific option seems to be missing from our site, it is most likely for one of the following reasons:

    \n
    \n
  • The option's original cost was small and does not have an impact on the vehicle’s current value.
  • \n
  • The option was a dealer-installed or aftermarket option.*
  • \n
  • The option may not be available for all styles within a vehicle model line.
  • \n
  • *Dealer-installed or aftermarket options can vary widely in original cost and quality, and so we have no reliable method to calculate how much value they add. We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause.
  • \n
    Learn more"}},{"@type":"Question","name":"What is the value of a 2020 used vehicle?","acceptedAnswer":{"@type":"Answer","text":"

    We are starting to add data for used 2020 cars. However, if you aren't seeing a specific car listed, it's likely that we have not yet collected enough transaction data to create reliable pricing for it as a used 2020 vehicle. You can still arrive at an approximate value for such vehicles using the following method:

    \n
    \n
  • Build and price the new car to get its current market value.
  • \n
  • Deduct between 5% and 10% for general wear and tear.
  • \n
  • Subtract 10 cents per mile.
  • \n
    Learn more"}},{"@type":"Question","name":"What is the value of a demo vehicle?","acceptedAnswer":{"@type":"Answer","text":"

    Edmunds is not able to provide pricing for demo vehicles because there is very little transaction data available for them. However, you can use the following method to arrive at an approximate value:

    \n

    Use our build and price tool to see the market value of a comparably equipped new vehicle of the same Make, Model and Style.\nIf any new car incentives or rebates are currently available for the vehicle, they will be applied in the final numbers breakdown.\nDeduct at least 20 cents for every mile the car has been driven. This figure is compensation for the mileage and for wear and tear on the vehicle.

    Learn more"}},{"@type":"Question","name":"What is the value of a salvage title vehicle?","acceptedAnswer":{"@type":"Answer","text":"

    Edmunds does not provide pricing estimates for vehicles that have major mechanical and/or body damage or for vehicles with \"branded\" titles (for example, salvaged, flooded, frame damaged, etc.). In general, though, we believe that a salvage title decreases a vehicle's value by up to 50% when compared to an identical vehicle with a clean title.

    Learn more"}},{"@type":"Question","name":"What are the vehicle conditions used for True Market Value pricing?","acceptedAnswer":{"@type":"Answer","text":"

    To get the most accurate values when calculating a used vehicle's market value, make sure to select the condition that most closely matches your vehicle. For guidance, here are full descriptions of the five conditions available to choose from:

    \n

    Outstanding: Exceptional mechanical, exterior and interior condition with no visible wear; no reconditioning required. The paint has a glossy appearance, and the tires are in nearly new condition. The vehicle has a clean title and is able to pass an emissions inspection. Approximately 5% of used vehicles qualify.

    \n

    Clean: Minimal wear and tear with no major mechanical or cosmetic problems; may require limited reconditioning. The paint has a glossy finish but may have slight scratches or dings. The interior will have minimal fading and wear. The tires have substantial tread remaining. The vehicle has a clean title and is able to pass an emissions inspection.

    \n

    Average: Normal wear and tear. The vehicle may have a few mechanical and/or cosmetic problems and may require some reconditioning. The paint has some dullness, and the vehicle may have a considerable number of scratches or dings. Interior material is slightly worn and faded. The tires have some usable tread remaining. The vehicle has a clean title and is able to pass an emissions inspection.

    \n

    Rough: The vehicle has several mechanical and/or cosmetic problems. The exterior and interior need significant repairs. The tires may need to be replaced. The vehicle may require minor repairs to pass an emissions inspection but has a clean title.

    \n

    Damaged: Major mechanical and/or body damage that may render it in non-safe running condition. The exterior and interior are damaged or worn. The tires need to be replaced. The vehicle may have a branded title (for example, salvaged, flooded, frame damaged, etc.) and may require significant repairs to pass an emissions inspection.

    Learn more"}},{"@type":"Question","name":"Does Edmunds provide historical used car values (i.e., the value of a car on a specific date in the past)?","acceptedAnswer":{"@type":"Answer","text":"

    No. Edmunds does not provide historical True Market Value. We stopped our Historical TMV service in 2016 due to limited resources for a service that isn't our main mission, which is to help car buyers.

    Learn more"}}]},{"@context":"https://schema.org","@type":"BreadcrumbList","itemListElement":[{"@type":"ListItem","position":1,"item":{"@id":"https://www.edmunds.com/","name":"Home"}},{"@type":"ListItem","position":2,"item":{"@id":"https://www.edmunds.com/appraisal/","name":"Appraise Your Car"}}]}]

    How much is my car worth: Instant used car values

    Our free appraisal tool gives you an accurate price for your vehicle — in as little as a minute. We won't ask for personal info, and you won't be contacted by third parties.


    How it works

    Enter VIN or license plate

    Enter VIN or license plate

    Help us identify your car. No private info needed.

    Answer a few quick questions

    Answer a few quick questions

    What color is it? What condition is it in?

    See your appraisal

    See your appraisal

    Get a value based on recent data in your area.


    A quick guide to the car value tool

    How values are calculated: We use data from a variety of sources, including dealer transactions, car depreciation costs, and consumer information. The appraised value is based on factors such as the car's year, make, model, trim, mileage, depreciation and features.

    Which vehicles can be appraised: Just about every make is covered, including luxury brands such as Lexus and Mercedes-Benz. The tool appraises vehicles dating back to 1990, so if you own a classic car, this method will not work. In that specific case, you'd need to find a specialized classic car guide, such as Hagerty, to determine its fair market value.


    Getting the most out of the tool

    The tool will ask you to describe your vehicle. Let's talk about why it's worth your time to put in the right options.

    The importance of style and options

    After you've entered the vehicle year and make, you'll select the style, also called the trim level. The style can refer to the type of engine, standard features, or the number of doors it has. Here's a refresher on trim levels.


    You've got an appraisal. Now what?

    Appraising your car is the first step to getting a good return for it. Nearly every vehicle depreciates over time, so it's important to know where yours stands. Knowing its value will help you determine what steps to take next.

    Many people aren't sure how to proceed after getting an appraisal, however. It's great to have a value, but what are you supposed to do now? With this in mind, we've come up with a few scenarios that will help you formulate a plan.


    Frequently asked questions


    Shop used cars

    Search by:
    To
    To
    Up to
    per month