X-Small SUVs

Extra-small SUVs are the smallest and least expensive crossovers you can buy, pairing an elevated driving position with excellent maneuverability. Cost-cutting is sometimes apparent, but top-trim versions can feel surprisingly upscale.
2021 Mazda CX-30
1
Introduced in 2020

Mazda CX-30

MSRP
$22,050 - $34,050
Edmunds Rating
7.9 out of 10
Combined MPG
25 - 28
2021 Buick Encore GX
2
Introduced in 2020

Buick Encore GX

MSRP
$24,200 - $30,600
Edmunds Rating
7.9 out of 10
Combined MPG
28 - 29
2021 Hyundai Kona
2
Introduced in 2018

Hyundai Kona

MSRP
$20,500 - $29,550
Edmunds Rating
7.9 out of 10
Combined MPG
27 - 30


Small SUVs

Small SUVs are among the hottest vehicles in today's market, thanks to virtues like reasonable pricing, excellent versatility and a just-right size. They've even begun to supplant midsize sedans as a sensible family vehicle.
1
Redesigned in 2017

Honda CR-V

MSRP
$25,350 - $35,150
Edmunds Rating
8.1 out of 10
Combined MPG
29 - 30
2
Redesigned in 2017

Mazda CX-5

MSRP
$25,370 - $37,505
Edmunds Rating
8.1 out of 10
Combined MPG
24 - 28
3
Redesigned in 2021

Nissan Rogue

MSRP
$25,850 - $37,030
Edmunds Rating
8.0 out of 10
Combined MPG
28 - 30

Small 3-row SUVs

If you need a lot of seats on a tight budget, a small three-row SUV might be a good fit. The third row will be cramped for anyone larger than a child, and there's not much cargo room with the third row deployed, but it's nice to have the option.
1
Redesigned in 2016

Kia Sorento

MSRP
$29,390 - $42,590
Edmunds Rating
8.2 out of 10
Combined MPG
24 - 26
2
MSRP
Not available
Edmunds Rating
7.9 out of 10
Combined MPG
Not available
3
Redesigned in 2018

Volkswagen Tiguan

MSRP
$25,245 - $39,095
Edmunds Rating
7.3 out of 10
Combined MPG
24 - 25

Midsize SUVs

For growing families or frequent road trippers, midsize SUVs make a lot of sense. They have a larger back seat and more cargo room than their smaller siblings, while some models offer off-road variants for buyers in search of something different.
1
Redesigned in 2019

Honda Passport

MSRP
$32,590 - $43,980
Edmunds Rating
8.1 out of 10
Combined MPG
21 - 22
2
MSRP
$30,855 - $50,025
Edmunds Rating
7.9 out of 10
Combined MPG
19 - 22
3
Redesigned in 2021

Toyota Venza

MSRP
$32,570 - $39,900
Edmunds Rating
7.8 out of 10
Combined MPG
39

Midsize 3-row SUVs

Midsize three-row SUVs provide lots of utility at a reasonable price. Expect advanced safety features, too, along with capable acceleration when you need it.
1
Top Rated vehicle
Introduced in 2020

Kia Telluride

MSRP
$32,190 - $44,390
Edmunds Rating
8.4 out of 10
Combined MPG
21 - 23
2
Introduced in 2020

Hyundai Palisade

MSRP
$32,675 - $47,900
Edmunds Rating
8.2 out of 10
Combined MPG
21 - 22
3
Redesigned in 2016

Honda Pilot

MSRP
$32,250 - $49,920
Edmunds Rating
8.1 out of 10
Combined MPG
22 - 23

Large SUVs

Large SUVs are classic utility vehicles. These truck-based workhorses can tow a boat and transport a family of eight at the same time. Fuel economy is predictably forgettable, but if maximum versatility is what you need, these big rigs deliver.
1
Redesigned in 2021

Chevrolet Suburban

MSRP
$50,700 - $75,300
Edmunds Rating
7.6 out of 10
Combined MPG
16 - 18
1
Redesigned in 2021

GMC Yukon

MSRP
$51,000 - $71,600
Edmunds Rating
7.6 out of 10
Combined MPG
16 - 18
3
Redesigned in 2018

Ford Expedition

MSRP
$49,025 - $78,825
Edmunds Rating
7.5 out of 10
Combined MPG
18 - 20


X-Small luxury SUVs

Extra-small luxury SUVs offer a prestigious badge at an affordable price. They don't always deliver luxury-grade comfort and performance, but a few gems stand out.
1
Introduced in 2020

Mercedes-Benz GLB-Class

MSRP
$38,050 - $49,500
Edmunds Rating
8.1 out of 10
Combined MPG
23 - 26
2
Redesigned in 2016

BMW X1

MSRP
$35,400 - $37,400
Edmunds Rating
8.0 out of 10
Combined MPG
26 - 27
3
Redesigned in 2021

Mercedes-Benz GLA-Class

MSRP
$36,230 - $54,500
Edmunds Rating
7.9 out of 10
Combined MPG
23 - 28

Small luxury SUVs

Small luxury SUVs cost more than their extra-small counterparts, but the adage about getting what you pay for is true. These crossovers typically offer a more comfortable ride, nicer materials and better performance, as well as a larger cabin, of course.
1
Introduced in 2016

Mercedes-Benz GLC-Class

MSRP
$43,200 - $73,900
Edmunds Rating
8.3 out of 10
Combined MPG
17 - 25
2
Redesigned in 2018

Volvo XC60

MSRP
$41,700 - $69,500
Edmunds Rating
7.9 out of 10
Combined MPG
23 - 27
3
Redesigned in 2019

Acura RDX

MSRP
$38,200 - $51,000
Edmunds Rating
7.9 out of 10
Combined MPG
23 - 24

Midsize luxury SUVs

Midsize luxury SUVs generally provide stout performance, the latest in luxury options and lots of space for passengers and cargo. Also included here is a new sub-class of SUV "coupes," which sacrifice practicality for style.
1
Top Rated vehicle
Redesigned in 2020

Mercedes-Benz GLE-Class

MSRP
$54,750 - $113,950
Edmunds Rating
8.4 out of 10
Combined MPG
16 - 23
2
MSRP
$76,500 - $116,000
Edmunds Rating
8.1 out of 10
Combined MPG
17 - 20
2
Redesigned in 2019

Porsche Cayenne

MSRP
$67,500 - $163,200
Edmunds Rating
8.1 out of 10
Combined MPG
17 - 20

Midsize 3-row luxury SUVs

Midsize luxury three-row SUVs typically offer seating for seven, or six if you spring for second-row captain's chairs. Make sure to bring the family along for the test drive; it's not unusual to find that the third row is tight for taller children or adults.
1
Redesigned in 2017

Audi Q7

MSRP
$54,950 - $72,000
Edmunds Rating
8.1 out of 10
Combined MPG
20 - 21
2
Redesigned in 2014

Acura MDX

MSRP
$44,500 - $61,750
Edmunds Rating
8.0 out of 10
Combined MPG
21 - 27
3
Redesigned in 2020

Lincoln Aviator

MSRP
$51,100 - $88,335
Edmunds Rating
7.7 out of 10
Combined MPG
20 - 23

Large luxury SUVs

In terms of road presence, there's nothing quite like a large luxury SUV. With plenty of seating and strong towing abilities, these behemoths are as functional as they are impressive. Not many other vehicles offer quilted leather upholstery along with underbody protection for serious off-roading.
1
Redesigned in 2020

Mercedes-Benz GLS-Class

MSRP
$76,000 - $132,100
Edmunds Rating
8.6 out of 10
Combined MPG
16 - 21
2
Redesigned in 2018

Lincoln Navigator

MSRP
$76,185 - $101,325
Edmunds Rating
8.4 out of 10
Combined MPG
17 - 18
3
Redesigned in 2021

Cadillac Escalade

MSRP
$76,195 - $102,995
Edmunds Rating
8.0 out of 10
Combined MPG
16 - 17

Super luxury SUVs

Planning to star in a music video? You've come to the right place. Superlux SUVs are the fanciest of the fancy. They're designed for shoppers who demand the best, no matter the price.
1
MSRP
Not available
Edmunds Rating
8.2 out of 10
Combined MPG
Not available
2
Redesigned in 2019

Mercedes-Benz G-Class

MSRP
$131,750 - $156,450
Edmunds Rating
7.0 out of 10
Combined MPG
14 - 18
3
Redesigned in 2013

Land Rover Range Rover

MSRP
$92,000 - $211,000
Edmunds Rating
6.9 out of 10
Combined MPG
15 - 24

Small performance SUVs

Don't let the word "small" throw you off. Compact performance SUVs are among the most capable all-around performers on the planet, pairing major driving thrills with plenty of SUV versatility.
1
Introduced in 2017

Mercedes-Benz AMG GLC 63 S

MSRP
$84,100
Edmunds Rating
8.4 out of 10
Combined MPG
18
2
Introduced in 2020

Tesla Model Y Performance

MSRP
$39,990 - $60,990
Edmunds Rating
8.1 out of 10
Combined MPG
111 - 125
3
Introduced in 2020

BMW X3 M

MSRP
$69,900
Edmunds Rating
7.9 out of 10
Combined MPG
16

Midsize performance SUVs

If you need a lot of space but want sports-car acceleration and handling, too, a midsize performance SUV could be just the ticket. These steroidal SUVs boast incredible power and athleticism, yet they also deliver wagon-like practicality.
1
Introduced in 2019

Lamborghini Urus

MSRP
$218,009
Edmunds Rating
8.4 out of 10
Combined MPG
14
2
Introduced in 2020

Audi SQ7

MSRP
$85,000 - $91,200
Edmunds Rating
8.2 out of 10
Combined MPG
17
3
Introduced in 2020

Audi SQ8

MSRP
$89,000 - $94,500
Edmunds Rating
8.1 out of 10
Combined MPG
17


Large performance SUVs

The laws of physics technically still apply to these high-horsepower family haulers, but that may be hard to believe when you're hurtling along inside one. Want your family to experience maximum driving excitement along with the usual luxury? These SUVs should hit the spot.
Not enough vehicles yet to rank
Introduced in 2021

BMW ALPINA XB7

MSRP
Not available
Edmunds Rating
7.9 out of 10
Combined MPG
Not available


Edmunds' experts test 200 vehicles per year on our test track. We also test them using a 115-mile real-world test loop of city streets, freeways and winding canyons. The data we gather results in our ratings. They’re based on 30-plus scores that cover performance, comfort, interior, technology, utility and value.



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Video reviews

CARLOS LAGO: Edmunds. Home of serious car reviews. [MUSIC PLAYING] CARLOS LAGO: Hey. Carlos Lago with Edmunds here. And that's a V8 Jeep. More specifically, it's the 2021 Jeep Wrangler Rubicon 392. A Wrangler with 470 horsepower that you can just go buy from your local dealership like that's a totally normal thing. In this video, we're going to explain what that engine is, how it fits, how quick it makes this Jeep Wrangler, how glorious it sounds, and how it feels on and off road. Hey, if you don't like videos like this one, leave a comment below. We want to know why. And if you do like videos like this one, tell that other commenter why they're wrong. How could you not like a video like this one? Also, check the links in the description for more information and of course, visit Edmunds.com/sellmycar to get an instant cash offer on your car, truck, or V8 Jeep Wrangler. Cramming a 6.4 liter V8 into a Wrangler Rubicon isn't an easy or inexpensive process. For starters, the 392, that's the displacement of cubic inches, it's only available in the off-road Rubicon spec, and it has a starting price of $75,000. That's approximately 30 grand more than a four-door Rubicon without options. Seems steep, right? But remember, there's no way you'd probably be able to do this in the aftermarket for the same money and retain the factory functionality. The engine is fundamentally the same one that you'd find under the hood of that Dodge Charger or Dodge Challenger that's always driving way too fast in your neighborhood. On top of 470 horsepower, it also makes 470 pound feet of torque. And it's connected to an eight-speed automatic and a two-speed transfer case. I would also just like to take a second to recognize that this is a Jeep Wrangler that, in terms of displacement, has a larger V8 than you'll find under the hood of any full-sized pickup. I love this country. Now, how did Jeep actually fit this engine in here? Well, it took a lot of adjustments and modifications. The accessory drive system on the front, for example, had to be changed. The alternator now sits at the top passenger side of the engine. At the bottom, you've got an oil pan that's kind of been flipped around. You've got a new oil filter. You've got new exhaust manifolds. And then you have this whole plastic thing at the top here. What is that? Well, when you have an engine this big in a tiny engine bay, air supply becomes very important. The engine, of course, needs to breathe air to run, but it also needs air to cool itself down. But when it's in a Jeep, you also need to expect it to be able to drive-through, I don't know, a river, a lake. So, maintaining the fording depth is very important, as well. So Jeep designed this system to separate air from water and evacuate more water than intakes normally have to deal with. Jeep says that the system can run with the hood scoop totally clogged. And essentially, this means you don't need to run a snorkel, which is kind of a shame because snorkels look cool. So the first question people will ask you when you're telling them you've got a V8 Wrangler is, will it do a burnout? And unfortunately, the answer is no. No, this American 470 horsepower SUV cannot do a burnout because it's full-time all wheel drive, or four-wheel drive. It's a real tragedy. But you know what isn't a tragedy is the acceleration. The second question people will ask you is, how quick is it? And it turns out, quite quick. We've already tested it. I'm going to do an acceleration run now to show you what it looks like as we put the specs up in graphics. I've turned on the exhaust, or the performance exhaust by hitting the button. The next step is just to hit the gas. [ENGINE REVVING] CARLOS LAGO: Just listen to that. And there's the speed limiter. So, is it quick? Yes. Is it quicker than it has any right to be? Yes. But that's what makes it so amazing. And if you couldn't tell by my face, I absolutely adore how fast or quick this thing is in a straight line. And that sound. That sound is fantastic. [MUSIC PLAYING] CARLOS LAGO: And now we're off road. Ahead of me, of course, is our infamous Ziggurat of Integrity that the Jeep Wrangler Rubicon will have no trouble climbing up. We're doing this, though, because there's a key difference in the drive train between this 392 and a regular Rubicon, aside from that V8 engine. And that has to do with the low range ratio. This doesn't have numerically as high of a ratio or short of a ratio. However that works out in terms of language. So the crawl ratio overall isn't as high as what you get in a standard Rubicon. But when you have 470 pound feet of torque from a V8 engine, does it really matter? I would say not. Also, how is the throttle control at really low speeds? When you're in four low, which I'll get into now. When you're in four low and you're climbing up something that needs a lot of careful control at low speeds to meter out all that torque, what's the throttle control in a V8 engine going to be like? Let's find out. I'll put it in four low. I'm going to lock the front and rear differentials, because you still have those in this 392. And I'm going to disconnect the front sway bar, which you still have in the 392 Rubicon. All right. So just going to leave it in drive and see if I can't run over this GoPro. A bit of throttle and we're up on the first step. Second step. Third step. And that's the top, yeah? We're checking with Casey on the outside to make sure that's the top. That was really easy, as you would expect a regular Rubicon to be. But the throttle control was really smooth as well. Yeah. This is still a Rubicon, even though it has a V8. Let's get out and take a look. Oh, boy. Can I actually get out? Don't do this at home, kids. You know, I'm just doing some truck stuff. I think I'm getting all right at this. So, Rubicon 392 is still a Rubicon, surprise surprise. But there are some key differences between this and a non-V8 Rubicon. Let's look at the front. Hi, there. So, front end. It's actually pretty similar up here. But we do get an opportunity to look at some of the things that were changed on this V8 to make it fit in here, specifically the oil pan, which has a sump in the back. Apparently, on normal 6.4 liter V8s in the Stellantis lineup, which it's called now, that sump is closer to the front. But you got this front solid axle here blocking the way, so that wouldn't really work. And hopefully, the oil filter is right up here, which makes for changes really easy. Or, let's say, parking lot pranks if you really want to ruin someone's day. Don't do that. As for suspension and clearance differences, we'll talk about them at the back here because that front wheels kind of jammed up in the fender. But as you can see, the Fox shocks are proudly displayed. Those are standard on the Rubicon 392. But you don't get them factory on other Rubicons. This has a 2 1/2 inch lift relative to standard Rubicons, as well. And that improves the clearances, specifically the approach and departure angle, by half a degree, I think. Wheels and tires. They're 17 inch wheels all around with a beadlock capability. So you have a means of mechanically fixing the tire to the rim of the wheel if you plan on doing really gnarly stuff. And the tires themselves are 33 inch BF Goodrich KO2. But you can option mud terrain tires, as well. I believe they're Falkens. Lastly, we have to call this out. If you've been watching this channel for a while, you've known that we've driven a lot of SUVs and trucks up the Ziggurat of Integrity. And the Jeep Wrangler is always the one that leaves its driver's side rear tire on the ground. Why is that? Well, it's because this Jeep has better articulation than pretty much anything on the market. You can disconnect the front sway bar electronically. And that allows the chassis and suspensions to flex. And why it's important to keep this tire on the ground when that tire is way up in the air is because that means this tire can still keep applying power to the ground. And that's important because it means that all of your tires are still touching the ground. That's generally a good thing when you're trying to crawl. [ENGINE REVVING] CARLOS LAGO: The Rubicon 392 does what you would expect a Rubicon to do. Obviously, it's appropriate for the name. It has the clearance. It has the articulation. But what makes it so special is that V8 engine. And it's not that it becomes suddenly a sporty SUV. That's not the point at all. And yet, that's what a lot of people assume when I tell them that, yeah, this Wrangler has got a 470 horsepower V8. Does it handle? No. Does it stop well? No. It's about delivering that Rubicon capability, but with a fantastic soundtrack. Listen. [ENGINE REVVING] CARLOS LAGO: And that will make you laugh every single time you experience it. That's really what makes this Wrangler so special. I'm driving at moderate speeds through a sand wash. And yeah, this is not a Baja-destined Wrangler. It's more for all-purpose off road. And yet, the experience is so much fun in this thing. It's not made to be the fastest for speed, but it's that combination of just incredible power and soundtrack in something that, it appears, was not necessarily intended to have it. And that's why it's so much fun in every situation. It's that merge of, yeah, we did an engine swap in this things. Not because we should, but because we could. And what becomes really weird out of this Frankenstein-ish experiment is that what benefits the most is the on-road driving experience. I've logged a couple hundred miles in this Wrangler, and I can tell you by far it's been the nicest one to drive on city streets and freeways. The additional weight of this engine and all the supporting hardware, and the new shocks and whatever changes else they've made, have quieted down the ride, have made the steering easier to control, have made the interior quieter, as well. This is a more refined, dare I say it, version of the Wrangler Rubicon. That's by no means to say it's comfortable. That's by no means to say it's going to be anything other than a Wrangler. It still has a lot of those elements. But it is so far improved versus the Wrangler Rubicon that it's based on. And that on-road improvement makes this thing the best Wrangler yet, for sure. Yeah, it comes with a price tag. Yeah, it comes with a hefty fuel economy issue. But you know what? I'd say given how this makes me feel from behind the wheel, I'd trade off all of that. This makes everybody who gets in it, everybody who experiences the acceleration and the capability off-road, it makes people smile. And hey, this is a Jeep. That's what it should be doing. It should be fun. This is one of the remaining few unabashedly characterful vehicles that you can go buy new. And I'm so happy it exists. And I'm so happy that it is this ridiculous. Are their competitors? Kind of. Yeah, there will be a V8 Defender. Yeah, there's a Bronco coming out soon. And there might be a version of that with the V8. Yes. There is the G-Wagon. But none of them, based on what I've been able to drive so far, are going to match you-- give you exactly what this offers. Ultimately, this is still a Jeep. You can still take the doors off. You can still drop the windshield. You can still take the roof off. And that experience, outside of the forthcoming Bronco potentially, is completely unique, especially with this soundtrack. To put it simply, I adore this thing. It's just fun. The Wrangler Rubicon 392 is fantastic. Big surprise, right? But it's great because it merges the capability you'd expect from a Rubicon with this V8 soundtrack and acceleration you'd expect from a 6.4 liter, 470 horsepower V8. And it also adds a bunch of on-road improvements, from ride quality, to refinement, to steering feel, and all that. And passing power, of course. How could we forget? On top of that though, this is a really fun vehicle to drive no matter where you drive it. I swear, I've laughed more behind the wheel of this thing than I have in most sports cars I've driven in the past few years. Whenever you get a first timer in the passenger seat, get a camera on them when the first time you nail the gas. It's really that much fun. Are there downsides? Of course. It's $75,000 to start. And that's a lot of money. But I'd argue that this is a wholly unique experience that you can't really find or get from a competitor. Also, 14 mpg combined by the EPA. That's not great. But if you really care about fuel economy, you probably stopped watching this video a long time ago. And if you haven't it and you're hate watching it, maybe get a new hobby. I don't know. Or talk to somebody who cares. Anyway, thanks for watching this video. If you want to know more, check the links in the description. Edmunds.com/sellmycar. Like, comment, subscribe. I'm out of here.

2021 Jeep Wrangler Rubicon 392 Review | Loving the V8! | Price, Engine, Off-Roading & More

FAQ

What are the best SUVs on the market?

Sport-utility vehicles (SUV), also referred to as crossovers, are the most popular vehicle type in recent years. Most buyers find their needs are met by either a compact SUV or a midsize three-row crossover. Our top pick for a compact SUV goes to the Mercedes-Benz GLC-Class Coupe for fitting tons of utility into a relatively small package. For shoppers who have a growing family or who just need extra cargo capacity, the Kia Telluride is our top-rated midsize three-row SUV. If you need a full-size SUV, the Ford Explorer is our top pick, though the Chevrolet Suburban offers more cargo space. Learn more

What is the top-rated SUV for 2019?

Shoppers looking for a little more attitude and capability lucked out in 2019: The redesigned Honda Passport became our top-rated midsize SUV when it launched. Honda had several top-rated SUVs for 2019, including the compact CR-V and midsize three-row Pilot. In the luxury class, the Mercedes-Benz GLC is our top pick for a compact SUV, and the Audi Q7 is our top-rated luxury midsize three-row vehicle and a great choice for families. Learn more

What is the top-rated SUV for 2020?

The three-row Kia Telluride has taken the SUV world by storm, offering a remarkable blend of luxury, space and style at an attractive price. Its corporate cousin, the Hyundai Palisade, delivers similar strengths in a more understated package. Top-rated compact SUVs include perennial favorites such as the Honda CR-V and Mazda CX-5. In the luxury class, the Mercedes-Benz GLE is a top-rated midsize SUV, while the Mercedes-Benz GLS competes with the Lincoln Navigator for top honors in the full-size SUV segment. If you like the Navigator, keep in mind that the Ford Expedition is a less luxurious version at a more reachable price point. Learn more

What are the best used SUVs to buy?

Look for "CPO" or certified pre-owned vehicles if you're shopping for used SUVs. Some of the CPO vehicles we like are the Honda CR-V and Mazda CX-5 in the compact SUV segment. If you need a little more off-road capability, the Subaru Outback is a good choice, and if you need three rows, the Honda Pilot is a top pick. Finally, if you need maximum cargo capacity, the Chevrolet Suburban is worth looking into. Learn more

Best SUV Summary

Best X-Small SUVs

  1. 2021 Mazda CX-30
  2. 2021 Buick Encore GX
  3. 2021 Hyundai Kona
  4. 2021 Subaru Crosstrek
  5. 2021 Kia Soul
  6. 2021 Mazda CX-3
  7. 2021 Kia Seltos
  8. 2021 Honda HR-V
  9. 2021 Hyundai Venue
  10. 2021 Nissan Kicks

Best Large performance SUVs

  1. 2021 BMW ALPINA XB7

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